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Eleonora Malacarne

Email: eleonora.malacarne@transpoco.com

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3 mistakes that ground handlers should avoid at any cost

by Eleonora Malacarne on Nov 21, 2019 9:00:00 AM

3 mistakes that ground handlers should avoid at any cost

In the daily operations of ground support equipment, that circle around the departure and arrival of aircraft that have to take place in limited spaces with a great deal of time pressure, there are unfortunately many things that can go wrong.

In order to maximise safety in such a challenging environment, to meet airline requirements and comply with their strict turnaround times, there are some mistakes that ground handlers have to avoid at any cost. In this post we deal with 3 of them.

#1 Compromising training time. The learning curve of ground handling staff is an important one, but the time dedicated to training staff must not be sacrificed. The majority of aviation literature is about the training of pilots, cabin crew and engineers, while the shared knowledge about ground services is still limited. Practical training is thus an extremely important resource, as there is also no specific accreditation schemes or licenses in place as is the case for other aviation roles.

#2 Not understanding which aircraft they are dealing with. This might be seen as something obvious but it is actually extremely challenging if we think about the ground operations usually required, the high density of equipment needed per aircraft, the fact that a lot of ground handling work needs to happen simultaneously and in a swift way. Knowing the aircraft configuration and part is then essential in order to consider manoeuvring on the ramp, with special reference to limited space or special components that have to be considered to avoid human error and incidents.

#3 Not reporting abnormal procedures. Abnormal operations that do not lead to visible damage, "near-miss" incidents and similar events need to be reported even if they do not cause injuries or harm. The idea is that only approved and standardized procedures are adopted, while abnormal one are flagged in order not to be repeated.

 

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Topics: GSE fleets, Airport fleet management

Transpoco to form Telematics Partnerships at Dubai Airshow

by Eleonora Malacarne on Nov 18, 2019 9:00:00 AM

Transpoco to form Telematics Partnerships at Dubai Airshow

Transpoco, the leading telematics and aviation fleet management software provider, is attending the Dubai Airshow to meet with a number of UAE based companies, with the aim of forming partnerships to supply its aviation ground service equipment (GSE) telematics solution.

Transpoco will travel to Dubai as part of the Enterprise Ireland Ministerial Trade and Investment Mission to Kuwait, UAE and Bahrain and will be at the show on the 19th November.

Transpoco is already recognised within Europe following the development of its bespoke aviation fleet management technology that has provided financial and operational efficiencies for airlines, airports and handling agents across the continent. The technology can similarly meet the GSE monitoring requirements of aviation companies based in the UAE and surrounding middle eastern locations and Transpoco has a series of meetings set up with companies at the show with the view to establish partnerships that can benefit from the same solutions in the region.

CEO of Transpoco, Andrew Fleury, will be attending the airshow and said:

“Following on from our successes in Europe, we have had a tremendous response to our technology in the UAE and are looking forward to developing some new and productive relationships while we are there this week”.

Transpoco recently announced its success in being awarded a contract by national flag carrier, Iberia, to implement its advanced fleet management solution on its ground support equipment in numerous airports across the airline’s Spanish network.

 

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Topics: GSE fleets, Airport fleet management

Transpoco to bring its GSE telematics solution to the Dubai Airshow

by Eleonora Malacarne on Nov 14, 2019 9:00:00 AM

Transpoco attending the Dubai Airshow 2019_1


As part of the expansion of the activity in the aviation sector, Transpoco is visiting the Dubai Airshow 2019 event next week. Transpoco will take part to the international aviation show as part of an Enterprise Ireland Trade & Investment Mission to Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Bahrain, led by Minister of State for Trade, Employment, Business, EU Digital Single Market and Data Protection, Pat Breen T.D.

With the Middle East seeing a boom in the aviation sector, the programme represents a unique opportunity for Transpoco to generate further business and enter into commercial relations with both airlines and ground handlers. Transpoco will be discussing its GSE telematics solution in Dubai and work with Enterprise Ireland to organize business meetings and to be involved in networking events together with potential partners, with the opportunity of developing business and targeting new customers.

The Dubai Airshow 2019 is probably going to be the biggest aerospace event in the Middle East, Asia & Africa. It will count on 1,300 exhibitors, media representation from every corner of the globe, 165 aircraft on display and feature areas. The 2019 edition will in fact see a number of dedicated spaces and conferences return to the show along with new additions: the one-day conference Airline CXO Summit, Airport Solutions Dubai, where the airport community will discuss the disruptors of the industry like AI, IoT and Big Data, the Cargo Connect event, Global Air Traffic Management and Space Pavilion and tech talks.

Commercial and general aviation, defence, space and cargo will be all involved in what will be an event dedicated to industry players making connections - with 80% of the world's population located within 8 hours from the event.

 

 

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Topics: News, Stats & Facts, GSE fleets, Airport fleet management

Ground handler injured in airport incident

by Eleonora Malacarne on Nov 12, 2019 9:00:00 AM

Ground handler injured in airport incident

A ground handler was seriously injured in an incident which took place around 10 days ago in the Dabolim airport in Goa, India, which involved the collision of a catering vehicle and a ground handling vehicle.

The incident took place shortly after the landing of Bangalore-Goa flight of the airline Air India which was supposed to later take-off towards Dubai. The passengers travelling to Dubai from Goa experienced a 2 hour delay.

According to airport sources, a catering vehicle and a ground handling vehicle which were both moving towards the aircraft, suffered a minor collision, which although resulted in the member of ground handling staff being injure and immediately rushed to the local hospital in a critical state.

The aircraft was not directly involved in the incident and no damage was caused to it.

It is being claimed, but yet unverified, that the incident took place due to the “failure of hydraulic movement” of the catering vehicle which was approaching the aircraft.

 

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Topics: GSE fleets, Airport fleet management

2 Ground Handling Companies fined for aircraft damage

by Eleonora Malacarne on Nov 7, 2019 9:00:00 AM

2 Ground Handling Companies fined for aircraft damage

Last week, two local ground handling service providers have been fined due to the damage of an aircraft at Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport. According to declarations released by the Taiwan Ministry of Transportation and Communications, the causes of the incident could have been human negligence or mechanical failure.

The remark comes after the ministry of Taiwan conducted an investigation into aircraft damage caused by poor ground handling services. According to press sources, the frequency of these type of incidents has increased at the Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport, putting the reputation and the image of the airport at risk.

In the month of October alone, the airport was the scene of 3 incidents which put the safety of the airport under scrutiny. The most serious of them took place on October 6th, when a Japan Airlines flight was delayed of nearly 8 hours after the aircraft was damaged while being towed to its gate before being boarded. The left engine cover of the aircraft scratched against a passenger gateway while the ground crew was towing the aircraft to the gate. After the incident, the identified accountable companies, Taoyuan International Airport Services Co. and Evergreen Airline Services Co. were fined for poor management and aircraft damage.

Following the incident and in an attempt to reduce safety risks, the local Deputy Transport Minister Wang Kwo-tsai stated the ministry would look into introducing a surveillance system to monitor ground operations by the end of 2019.

 

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Topics: GSE fleets, Airport fleet management

3 ways your Ground Support Equipment Fleet can save on costs

by Eleonora Malacarne on Nov 5, 2019 9:02:00 AM

3 ways your Ground Support Equipment Fleet can save on costs

Operating Ground Support Equipment Fleets is anything but easy. Daily ground support operations are carried out in fast sequences with very low room for mistakes, as these can lead to costly delays. The most diverse activities are carried out on the ramp, from vehicle maintenance to aircraft refueling, from de-icing (when necessary) to baggage management.

In such a demanding and fast-moving environment, ground handlers have to consider cost savings as one of their top priorities without endangering compliance and safety of passengers and workers. But there are some sound principles that, if followed, can still allow ground handlers to spare money. Let's have a look at them.

#1 Choosing the right vehicles. Vehicle choice is something that should happen after thorough consideration. In some environments, electric GSE can prove to be more efficient than diesel-powered equipment, and viceversa. The adoption of a vehicle can be justified despite high acquisition costs if proving to be more suitable for your type of procedures compared to another. A specific vehicle might not be perfect for anyone, but there is a great deal of data you can obtain from your assets that can help you make the appropriate decision in terms of savings and efficiency.

#2 Keeping vehicles in working order. Scheduled maintenance as well as daily vehicle checks are always the best way to save money down the road by avoiding last-minute servicing or costly rushed parts shipping. Unexpected repairs can be avoided by building a personalised maintenance calendar based on the actual needs of your GSE fleet, its actual working hours and performance.

#3 Getting the entire perspective. Before making important decision it is necessary to consider the overarching story of your fleet. If you can count on an accurate big picture view of your operations, identifying unnecessary costs (as well as unrevealed saving strategies) will be much easier.

 

 

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Topics: GSE fleets, Airport fleet management

4 demanding tasks airport ground handlers are called to face

by Eleonora Malacarne on Oct 31, 2019 9:03:00 AM

3 demanding tasks airport ground handlers are called to face


The ground handling industry is experiencing a steady growth in the last years. According to data shared by Aviation Pros, in 2016 the sector has been valued $54M by Visiongain, with strong growth rates to be projected over the following decade. According to Technavio, the annual growth rate of the ground handling sector is going to be of approximately 6 percent by 2020. Another forecast, the one of GM Insights, projects the aircraft ground handling system market size to exceed $160M by 2022.

Despite the extremely positive news and the fact that ground handlers are experiencing a moment of unprecedented prosperity, we don't have to forger that this means increased pressure and fierce competition.

What are the most demanding tasks ground handlers are called to face?

#1 - Meeting environmental targets. The aviation industry is growing at a fast pace and so is the ground handling industry, as a consequence. Handling fleets and GSE are subject to an increasing demand and have to be efficient, not only in terms of service, but also of environmental targets - that's why they are starting to look into alternative vehicles or ways to avoid unnecessary vehicle movements and fuel waste.

#2 - Providing a safe place to work. With so much going on in such a restricted space and time frame, concerns are high about safety for workers and passengers and the need for swift operations obviously must not compromise vehicle checks, maintenance and the carrying out of standardised procedures, that should not be skipped.

#3 - Reducing incidents. It has been estimated that occupational hazards, injuries and absences from the workplace result in multi-billion dollar costs close to $4B to the aviation industry and more specifically in the ground operations sector. In terms of aircraft ground damages, the $4B figure is closer to around $12B when the ancillary costs related to injuries, staff shortages, insurance-related costs to both employers and employees and other factors are taken into consideration. With such an activity increase, there is obviously good news in terms of business, but also more possibility of incidents - hence why this is a current and should be a constant challenge for ground handlers.

#4 - Keeping the pace with increasing air traffic. Congestion does not only happen in the air or on the roads of a country, but in airports too. The pressure is high to have efficient transportation systems, automated airport terminals and fast operations before take-off and after landing. Ground handlers need to understand the ongoing and future requirements and be ready to manage operations and comply with the expanding requirements.


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Topics: GSE fleets, Airport fleet management

Transpoco at the 21st annual Ground Handling International Conference

by Eleonora Malacarne on Oct 29, 2019 9:00:00 AM

Transpoco at the 21st annual Ground Handling International Conference-1

There is one more inspiring event planned for Transpoco for this 2019. Transpoco telematics is going to exhibit at the Ground Handling International Conference, which will take place in Amsterdam from 4th to 7th November, hosted in the Rai Convention Centre, an incredible venue located 12 minutes from the city centre and 8 minutes from Schiphol international airport, the ideal place to connect the key players in the handling sector.

The GHI Annual Conference brings unparalleled networking opportunities with 750+ decision makers from the world’s aviation industry. Transpoco will have the opportunity to talk business with major airline buyers as 180+ airline ground operations and procurement managers are expected.

The event will also help pick up best practice ideas: ground handlers, aviation companies and suppliers will be able to attend keynote conference presentations on managing margin squeeze; contract negotiation techniques; the non-IATA SGHA; embedding a high safety culture and developing a PRM strategy. Transpoco at the 21st annual Ground Handling International Conference2

We are just days away from this prominent event: Transpoco will exhibit at the stand number E26A. Contact us if you wish to book a demonstration of our system or to discuss your requirements with us.

Photo Credit: https://annual.groundhandling.com/

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Topics: News, Stats & Facts, GSE fleets, Airport fleet management

Why tracking pushback tractors brings huge value to your ramp operations

by Eleonora Malacarne on Oct 24, 2019 9:00:00 AM

Why tracking pushback tractors brings huge value to your ramp operations

There is a lot happening on an airport ramp and it is essential for airlines to know exactly where all vehicles are (not just the planes, though this might be the first thing coming to your mind!) on the ground. Thousands of people, staff members, and pieces of equipment move around just a few square meters - and so do millions of euros in investment.

One of those innumerable things going on is the pushback procedure, carried out by pushback and towing vehicles. Airlines conduct pushbacks around the clock, and rotate aircrafts like clockwork, often under critically short timeframes. The pushback is an airport procedure during which an aircraft is pushed backwards away from an airport gate by external power. Although many aircraft can also move backwards on the ground using reverse thrust (a procedure referred to as a powerback), the resulting jet blast or prop wash may cause damage to the terminal building or equipment. Engines close to the ground may also blow sand and debris forward and then suck it in to the engine, causing damage to the engine. A pushback using a tractor or tug is therefore the preferred method to move the aircraft away from the gate. All of the operations must be equipped with pushback tractors tugs which are completely reliable

It is therefore not surprising why pushback tractors and vehicles are a vital and integral element in ground support equipment fleets. How can then vehicle tracking help protect these vehicles and ensure the pushback procedure is performed with the highest standards of safety and efficiency?

 

#1 - Vehicle tracking helps locate pushback tractors and other GSE assets

According to different sources, quality and efficiency of services at airports must be improved. It is surprisingly easy to lose track of vital equipment and people in these busy locations, which means airport management loses time and money in resolving each issue. According to an European Commission press release, today, 70% of all delays to flights are already caused by problems due to the turnaround of aircrafts at airports (delays caused by airlines or their ground-handlers, airports or other parties involved in the turn around process). Tracking GSE assets such as pushback tractors can definitely make the difference in terms of time (and money ) savings and efficiency.

#2 - Vehicle tracking helps maintain your tractors
 Airplane tugs, particularly pushback-specific styles, are very expensive. They are built to safely move airplanes sometimes weighing nearly 200 tons, so they must be built heavy and durably. Considering this, it is paramount that pushback tractors are properly maintained, so that airlines can enjoy their long-term activity and the pushback procedure is conducted without any issue. In some cases GSE fleets need to keep track of different types of tractors, used for different aircrafts. Tracking technology can streamline the organisation of the maintenance checks needed for these assets and keep track of the different vehicle inspections needed.

#3 - Vehicle tracking helps assessing risks

Pushback is an extremely risky operation. The evidence of accidents and incidents is that there are a number of recurrent features of aircraft damage during pushback, often due to lack of clarity in communications, unserviceable vehicles, manoeuvring starting from a parking position different from the one marked.
By tracking pushback vehicles it is possible to detect any gaps in ground crew training that can be addressed or patterns in vehicle movements that help adopt safer procedures.

 

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Topics: GSE fleets, Airport fleet management

RAC research suggests drivers who idle should be fined

by Eleonora Malacarne on Oct 22, 2019 9:00:00 AM

RAC research suggests drivers who idle should be fined

According to a new RAC research made public last week, the 72% of the interviewed calls for an idling crackdown, with 44% of them stating drivers refusing to switch their engine off should be fined. 26% of the drivers surveyed, on another hand, think motorists should just be told to switch off without being fined, and a 2% thinks offenders should be fined without any type of warning.

After an initial call for more power to take action against drivers who idle, councils in the UK already have the authority to fine them, but as of now just a few chose to do it. The respondents to the survey would like to see some action taken against offenders, as 88% of them argued they see drivers idling while parking at the side of a road, 40% see drivers idling on a regular basis and 48% see them occasionally. 26% of respondents saw drivers idling outside schools.

With climate change and emissions being constantly in the news, 55% of those surveyed added that they are more concerned on the impact of vehicle emissions on the environment and public health than they were 3 years ago. But the top reason for switching off provided by the surveyed was instead cost, with 37% stating they would switch off to save on fuel, followed by 35% saying they would do it to help with air quality.

After in the June of this year the UK Government announced it would launch a consultation looking at increasing fines for those who idle, some councils have called for powers to deal with idling. Westminster City Council leader Nickie Aiken argued that “Fines are our last resort but when we establish a pattern of persistent idling we need to be able to send a message” and added that fines for company vehicles, such as supermarket delivery vans, that are caught idling need to be “a four-figure sum to be a sufficient deterrent”.

The war against idling has just started.

 

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Topics: Fleet Management, Fuel Economy, reduce emissions

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